Note: this table takes us just about HALFWAY THROUGH the Yvain.
Yvain is about 6800 lines long. The adventures leading up to his marriage with Laudine end with his marriage by around line 2170; the ring is withdrawn about 600 lines later, and he has regained his senses by line 3020.

Please let me know what to add/subtract. In some cases I have subdivided a single motif to show how different aspects may reflect different traditions. See below for a second table outlining some of the analogues in more detail, with many thanks to Ken Waldron for pointing these out.

A third table attempts to reconstruct the "original" archetype of the lady-at-the-fountain story.

Now there is a fourth table, courtesy of Sakal but also incorporating a suggestion by Jerry Schechter, which presents the relationship between Chretien's poem (the whole thing), the Welsh tale, and the Didot Perceval. In this case, the two other authors probably knew Chretien's poem but may also have known related folk material which they incorporated into their versions.
 
Motif, names, etc. Possible sources/analogues
Arthur asleep at Pentecost (contradicts tradition of display at this feast, from Geoffrey of Monmouth)
Knights telling stories classical dialogues?
The ugly herdsman (exercise in describing ugliness)
The marvelous fountain in Broceliande (water causes storm) Wace, Roman de Rou
Birds singing in harmony Voyage of St. Brendan
Husband defending lady associated w/body of water Diana of Nemi, cf. Ovid
Desire to avenge cousin
Desire to beat Arthur to the marvel
Desire to travel to see the marvels described St. Brendan
Horse cut in two by portcullis
Room within castle wall
Yvain & Laudine & a fountain Life of St. Kentigern (see below)
Laudine difficult of access, requiring duplicity Kentigern (see below)
Ring of invisibility (stone turned in or out) Gyges story in Cicero's De Officiis
Female bestows protective invisibility on man 
while he encounters hostile but desirable woman ruler
Virgil's Aeneid I
Man falls in love with woman seen through window Pyramus & Thisbe? (Ovid, French lai)
Body bleeds in presence of murderer Nibelungenlied? Folklore
Hero kills eminent man, marries widow Gyges (various versions)
Hero kills defender of woman/water; becomes defender Nemi
Woman persuades widow to remarry to defend her lands Anna and Dido in the Aeneid
Widow grieves violently then bonds immediately to next man Widow of Ephesus fable (Marie de France)??
Arthur comes to visit marvel
Kay & Gauvain fight hero (most of Chretien's romances)
Gauvain flirts "
Conflict of uxoriousness and chivalry "           Mercury rebuking Aeneas?
Protective ring of love Scottish Lai of  Desiré, Marie de France's Yonec (see below)
Lover forgets/betrays promise, loses woman's love Desiré, Marie de France's Lai of Lanval (see below)
Ring withdrawn by maiden
Lover goes mad on losing ring, becomes "wild man" Desiré; images of wild men with rings cited by Ken Waldron
Raw and cooked meat; vegetarianism Ovid's interest in meat-eating?
Hermit and knight/madman
Ointment to recover senses
Morgan's ointment Erec

Table of stories of fairy lovers with Lowlands Geographic connection

Life of St. Kentigern Desiré Yvain Lanval/Yonec (Marie de France)
Ewan & Lot's daughter Yvain & Laudine Yonec=Yvain-et
Ewan son of Urien Desiré son of the lord of Calatir in Scotland, loved by the king. Yvain son of Urien, trying to outdo Arthur Lanval, son of a (continental?)  king, out of favor in Arthur's court near Scotland
Ewan approaches Lot's daughter twice near a fountain; he decieves and rapes her. Desiré tries to rape a woman with basins near fountain near hermit's lodging Yvain is protected by Laudine's handmaiden Lunete after disturbing fountain Lanval takes a nap by a stream, is awakened by women with basins.
Woman leads D. to her lady, promising her love, which he obtains politely Lunete obtains Laudine's love for Yvain, then leads him to Laudine. The women lead him to a lady who loves him.
The lady gives D. a gold ring which he will lose if he does not behave properly; and if he loses it, he loses her. She urges him to continue to be a good knight. L. marries Y. and gives him a ring with a magic protective stone which will keep him from being hurt physically. He is not to lend it to anyone. The lady gives Lanval great wealth and promises to come to him whenever he thinks of her, so long as he doesn't tell any one about her.


In Yonec, the lady's lover says that she must be sure no-one know about his visits. Later, he gives her a magic ring which will prevent others from remembering their relationship.
King Lot's daughter, after many sorrows, gives birth to a son, Kentigern During a lengthy liaison in which he visits her frequently, the lady bears Desiré two children, a boy and a girl. Yonec is the son of the lady and her lover.
(In a later episode): a queen gives her ring to her lover; the king sees it on the lover's finger, throws it in the river, and accuses her of adultery when she can't produce it.  On his way to visit the lady, Desiré stops and confesses to the hermit; the ring disappears. D. can't find the lady any more. When Yvain overstays his promised time at Arthur's court, a maiden sent by Laudine takes the ring back, telling him Laudine doesn't want to see him any more. Lanval admits the liaison when pressed by Guenevere. He can no longer find his lady.


When Yonec's mother's husband becomes suspicius, he sets a trap for the lover, ending the liaison.
The queen languishes in prison and repents her adultery, confessing to Kentigern D. becomes ill with grief and languishes for a year. Y. goes mad but is helped by a hermit and, eventually, some women.  Lanval becomes despondent and is willing to be executed for a crime he has not committed.


Yonec's mother jumps out a window but is not killed. 
Kentigern gets her the ring back (from a fish)  His lady comes to him when he is alone, denies that she has ensorceled him or that their relationship is sinful, and offers to go to Mass, receive the Eucharist to prove her goodness. His son returns the ring to him. During their liaison, Lanval's lady comes to him when he is alone.


Yonec's father proves his goodness by receiving the Eucharist. He comes to her when she is alone.
D. attempts to visit the lady as she lies on a bed in a castle; he jumps in through a window which is the only possible access, alerting the guards who wound him, but is saved by a servant-girl. Early in the romance, Yvain first sees Laudine through a window in the castle; he is battered by the castle guards and attended by Lunete. Yonec's father visits his mother through the castle window which is the only access to her. This is where he is wounded.  Also, when she comes upon him lying on a bed in his own castle, she is in danger of attack by his people.
...and the marriage is re-established. The lady comes to the king's court with her children, asking for marriage to D. At the end of the romance, Laudine accepts him again in marriage, as a replacement for himself Lanval's mistress comes to the king's court to save him.
D. is invited by his wife to leave the court forever, though their children remain there. Lanval chooses to leave the court with his lady.

12th-c French/Anglo-Norman stories of knights with fairy lovers
Note: my reconstruction is definitely influenced by an awareness of the goddess Diana's patronage of hunters and of chaste persons, and her proclivity for bathing, and also of the story of Narcissus, which involves a youth who prefers hunting to love and finds his comeuppance at a fountain. I assume that the 12th-c writers would also have seen a continuity between the lais or aventures they told and the Classical stories (there is a contemporary Lai of Narcissus, which has a happy ending!).
To these might be added Marie's Guigemar, in which a youth who refuses to love is wounded while hunting a white deer and carried by Solomon's unmanned ship to be healed by a lady who becomes his lover and ties a knot to bind him to her.  We could also include Chaucer's Wife of Bath's Tale, which begins with a rape to which the fairy lady must provide a solution.


"Archetype" (?) Desiré (anon) Lanval (Marie) Graelant Mor (anon) Guingamor (anon) Yvain (Chretien)
Potiphar's wife/Hippolytus motif: wife of lord tries to seduce hero no later in story yes yes No, though she is present when he resolves on his quest
Narcissu motif:
Hero declares he has never known love
no no yes yes no
Hero is out of favor with lord no yes yes no no
Hero goes hunting for a white animal no, wandering cheerfully no, wandering sadly yes, though it begins as a wander yes, to prove himself on a quest, not a hunt
Hero comes to a fountain yes no, stream yes yes yes (a specific famous magic fountain)
Diana motif: Woman is bathing in fountain with attendants no, but a woman with two basins and bare feet is there women with basins and towels yes yes no
Rape attempt
(cf. Kentigern)
yes, on the secondary woman no yes, hero rapes the primary woman no, but he tries to take her clothes no
Woman agrees to be hero's lover but exacts a promise never to tell never to tell to remain in the area for a year
(also apparently never to tell)
(1) to stay 3 days
(2) to eat nothing
She marries him; 
he promises to return in a year
Hero breaks promise yes (maybe) yes ? apparently yes (2) yes
Hero suffers Can't find woman, languishes loses contact with woman, languishes, is prosecuted loses contact with  woman, languishes, is prosecuted Suddenly is 300 years old loses woman,
goes mad
Lady comes to hero to rescue him from suffering Twice, once in church and once at court at court at court She sends ladies to rescue him Yvain embarks on a quest to earn her love. She makes no overtures.
Hero ends up following lady to Otherworld yes, on the same horse yes, on the same horse on a different horse he is taken in a boat across the perilous river He will return to defend the fountain.

Yvain and two later works which may incorporate related motifs not used by Chretien.

Yvain. Variants in Welsh "Owein"
(from Sakal)
 Episode in Didot Perceval
(Jerry Schechter)
(click for text)
Carlisle. Arthur asleep at Pentecost Caerleon on Usk. Not Pentecost.
Knights telling stories.
Calogrenant. 
Cynon.
The vavasour, the bulls, the ugly giant herdsman and the forest animals. The club. First visits 2 yellow-haired boys and 24 maidens. Herdsman has one leg and one eye. Mound. Iron spear. 
The marvelous fountain in Broceliande (water causes storm) Not Broceliande, but 'in the outermost reaches' (of Arthur's Empire). (2 days' ride). No British geography given. A ford in the forest owned by the Lady of Avalon. When Perceval attempts to stop the custom, a storm ensues.
Birds singing in harmony   Black birds fly down to attack him. They are the fairy's damsels in bird shape, and he wounds one of them.
Husband defending lady associated w/body of water   Urban (=Urien?) prevents people from  drinking at the ford; his term is for one year.
Desire to avenge cousin and
prove Kay wrong.
Less used motivationally.
Desire to beat Arthur to the marvel. Description of visit to Fountain given three times (and again at the end).  Arthur does not set out to try the adventure of the Fountain, but to find Owein, whom he misses.
Desire to travel to see the marvels described Less explicit motivation.
Horse cut in two by portcullis  
Room within castle wall No secret catch or passage. Ring is passed through inner gate. The Avalon castle by the ford is invisible. The fairy and Urban are taken there for healing.
Yvain & Laudine & a fountain  
Laudine difficult of access, requiring duplicity  
Female associate of lady helps hero.  
Ring of invisibility (stone turned in or out)  
Female bestows protective invisibility on man 
while he encounters hostile but desirable woman ruler
 
Man falls in love with woman seen through window  
Body bleeds in presence of murderer No.
Hero kills eminent man, marries widow  
Hero kills defender of woman/water; becomes defender  
Woman persuades widow to remarry to defend her lands  
Influence of citizens of town.  
Widow grieves violently then bonds immediately to next man  
Arthur comes to visit marvel.
(Damosel Sauvage).
Not until Owein has been defending the Fountain for 3 years.
Kay & Gauvain fight hero  
Gauvain flirts  
Conflict of uxoriousness and chivalry  
Protective ring of love No. It is apparently the same ring all the time.
Lover leaves (for a few weeks), but forgets/betrays promise, loses woman's love Owein leaves for 3 months but is gone for 3 years.
Ring withdrawn by maiden. Maiden appears when Yvain remembers his promise. Only when ring is removed Owein remembers.
Lover goes mad on losing ring, becomes "wild man" Grows coat of hair and lives with animals.
Raw and cooked meat; vegetarianism Not mentioned.
Hermit and knight/madman Not mentioned.
Ointment to recover senses
- too much used
His body hair falls out over three months.
Countess' servant who knows Yvain. Does not know him.
Morgan's ointment No, but expensive.
Conquers countess' enemy  
Saves and befriends lion  
Rescues Lunete.These last five episodes parallel Yvain's initial adventure.  
The adventure of Yvain, Gawain and the two sisters. This long episode is not included in the Welsh version.
Castle of oppressed maidens Same 24 maidens as at beginning? The Black Oppressor.
Return to Fountain and reunion.