ShakespearEccentricity in Film & Media
Publications

index | richard burt | publications | syllabi | reviews | history & film | loser theory
academedia | censorship | aBURraTions of theory | shakespeare manifesto | psycho-cinem-analysis


 

Papers Delivered:

  • Richard Burt has papers at sessions of the Modern Language Association (1989, 1991, 2003, 2008, 2013), the VII, VIII, and IX World Shakespeare Congresses in Valencia, Spain in 2002, Brisbane, Australia in 2006, and Prague, Czech Republic in July 17-22, 2011; George Washington University (2014); the University of the Philippines (2013); Wuhan University, China (2013); Tsukbua University, Tokyo (2012); Donghai University, Shanghai, China (2011); Central Taiwan University (2009) and National Taiwan University (2009 and 2014); the Shakespeare Association of America (2003 and 2008); the British Museum (2008); the ACLA (2008); and the Getty Research Center (1995). Burt has delivered invited numerous colleges and universities, including Harvard University, Tufts University, New York University, Amherst College (Department of Law, Jurisprudence, and Social Thought), the University of Michigan, the Free University in Berlin, the University of Jena, the University of Tuebingen, the University of Morocco, the University of Rouen, the University of Kansas, the University of Reading, the University of Durham, Birbeck University, London, the University of Warwick, U.C. Irvine, the University of Lodz, Poland, the University of Alabama's Hudson Strode Lecture Series, Columbia University, and Arizona State University.

Publications

Books:

  • Co-Authored:
  • Authored:
  • Forthcoming:
  • Edited and Co-edited :
    • Shakespeares After Shakespeare: An Encyclopedia of the Bard in Mass Media and Popular Culture. 2 vol. Ed. Richard Burt (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2006), viii; 862 pp.
    • Shakespeare, the Movie II:   Popularizing the Plays on Film, TV, Video and DVD. Ed. Richard Burt and Lynda Boose (New York and London:   Routledge Press, 2003), xi, 340 pp.
    • Shakespeare After Mass Media. Ed. Richard Burt (New York and London: Palgrave, 2002).
    • The Administration of Aesthetics: Censorship, Political Criticism, and the Public Sphere. Ed. Richard Burt (Minneapolis, MN:  U of Minnesota P, 1994), xxx, 386 pp.   
    • Shakespeare, the Movie:   Popularizing the Plays on Film, TV, and Video. Ed. Lynda Boose and Richard Burt (New York and London:   Routledge Press, 1997), ix, 280 pp. Korean translation, 2001.
    • Enclosure Acts:   Sexuality, Property, and Culture in Early Modern England. Ed. Richard Burt and John Michael Archer. (Ithaca, NY: Cornell UP, 1994), x, 340 pp.
  • Monographs:
  • Chapters in Books and Articles in Journals (In Print ):
  • Chapters in Books:

Articles in Journals:

Co-Authored Articles:

Introductions :

    • "Shakespeare, the Movie, the Sequel: Popularizing the Plays on Film, Television, and DVD: Editors' Cut," in Shakespeare the Movie II. Ed. Richard Burt and Lynda E. Boose, (New York and London: Routledge Press, 2003), 1-13.
    • "To e- or not to e-? Schlockspeare in the Age of Electronic Mass Media," in Shakespeare After Mass Media. Ed. Richard Burt (New York: Palgrave, 2002), 1-32.
    • "The 'New' Censorship," in The Administration of Aesthetics: Censorship, Political Criticism, and the Public Sphere Ed. Richard Burt (Minneapolis: U of Minnesota P, 1994), xi-xxix.

Co-Authored Book Introductions :

    • "Shakespeare, the Movie." Co-authored with Lynda Boose, in Shakespeare, the Movie: Popularizing the Plays on Film,TV, and Video (New York and London: Routledge Press, 1997), 1-7.
    • "Introduction," co-authored with John Michael Archer, in Enclosure Acts: Sexuality, Property, and Culture in Early Modern England (Ithaca: Cornell UP, 1994), 1-13.

Books in Progress:

    • Yours, Posthumously

Forthcoming Chapters in Books and Articles in Journals

  • Now at press (articles solicited for for special issues and books, now awaiting copy-editing):
    • “Something's Rotting in the States of Hamlet:  Un/Reading Self-Corrupting Modern Un/Editions,” in Hamlet: A Critical Reader (Arden Shakespeare, 2016), a volume on Shakespeare’s Hamlet in the Arden Early Modern Drama Guides series ed; Ann Thompson and Neil Taylor, editors of all three texts of Hamlet in the Arden Third Shakespeare series (2006; second, revised edition, 2016). 

    • “’Read Madness’” C/Literally in the Archive: Shakespeare’s Contagious, Corrupting Cu(n)t,” in Borrows and Lenders  ed. Alexa Huang and Ayanna Thompson, 2015.
    • "Dubbing Shakespeare on Film,” in James Bulman, ed. The Oxford Handbook of Shakespeare and Performance  (OUP), 2015.
    • "To Do Justice To Derrida Doing Just Us: Archiving the Post Card" in Glossator, special issue entitled "Going Postcard: The Letter(s) of Jacques Derrida" ed. Michael O'Rouke, Volume 7 (Spring 2014)
    • "NachGloss /'la séance continue': The Last Words of “To Speculate—On ‘Freud’” in The Post Card: From Socrates to Freud and Beyond Translated into English, with Notes on a Passage Quoted in German from Friedrich Nietzsche’s Nachlass “of the 80s” AppendiX  / (anneX) / Anschluss," in Glossator, special issue entitled "Going Postcard: The Letter(s) of Jacques Derrida" ed. Michael O'Rouke, Volume 7 (Spring 2014)
    • "Sh  k  es   e re Cin-Offs Beyond Wreckognition: Film Philology, CiNOma, and Abbas Kiarostami's Where is My Romeo," in Shakespeare Spin-Offs. Ed. Amy Scott-Douglas. (Palgrave McMillan, 2014).
    • It's a Beautiful Monster: Robert Zemeckis's Beowulf, Formal Materiality, Paramediality, and the Hard Drive Rotations of Film and Media History. For images to this article, click here. CTheory.net
Now being translated into Czech for a volume on theories of censorship:
    • "(Un)Censoring in Detail: The Fetish of Censorship in the Early Modern Past and Postmodern Present," Censorship and Silencing: Practices of Cultural Regulation, Ed. Robert Post (Santa Monica, CA; Getty Research Institute Publications, 1998), 17-41. "We intend to publish two volumes: a Czech-language reader introducing the international discussion on (new) censorship (with articles by Aleida Assmann, Pierre Bourdieu, Richard Burt, Judith Butler, Roger Chartier, Robert Darnton, Marta Fik, Michael Holquist, Beate Mueller, among others). You can find a short expose in the journal Mitteilungen der Gesellschaft fuer Buchforschung in Österreich (www.buchforschung.at)"
    • --Michael Wegerbauer,
      Head of the Department
      for Research into Literary Culture
      Institute of Czech Literature of the
      Czech Academy of Sciences

Media Coverage and Interviews:

    • Interviewed by Ellen Lupton, columnist for the New York Times, and quoted in her blog July 13, 2010: http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/07/12/how-to-lose-a-legacy/
    • Interviewed by NY Times reporter Celia McGee for a story on Stephen Greenblatt's co-authored play Cardenio in April 2008. The story, "Shakespearean Brushes Up His Playwriting," was published on May 4, 2008.
    • Interviewed by Time magazine journalist Jumana Farourky for a story she was writing on "The Shakespeare industry," published in the March 27, 2006 international issue.
    • Interviewed by Sally Placksin, for MLA's radio program,"What's the Word?" on Al Pacino and Shakespeare. The interview took place on Wednesday, January 18, 2006 at 10:30am (EST). 
    • Interviewed by Krissy Clark of "Weekend America" (airs on more than 100 NPR stations around the U.S.) for a show about Shakespeare's Birthday, April 20, 2005.
    • Shakespeare, the Movie II profiled in UF Clasnotes, 2003.
    • Interviewed about "Shakespeare and America" on Chicago Public Radio's Odyssey, April 29, 2003.
    • Interviewed by reporter David Glenn of the Chronicle of Higher Education for a "Hot Type" story on the fate of the UMass Press, July 7, 2003. The story ran July, 2003.
    • National Public Radio interview (Chicago syndicated show "Odysessy" with host Gretchen Helfrich) on "Shakespeare in America," April 28, 2003.
    • Interviewed by Seattle Times reporter Misha Berson for a story on Shakespeare and business seminars. The story, "Once More into the Breach, Dear CEOs," ran August 18, 2002.
    • January 2001, interviewed by reporter Andy Brown for an issue of a journal entitled Literary Cavalcade devoted to Shakespeare and mass culture.
    • Quoted and discussed in "The Pound of Flesh," a story about Shakespeare pornography in Lingua Franca , Volume 11, No. 6 September 2001), 8-9. The story was reprinted on the front page of the London Independent newspaper on August 22, 2001.
    • Interviewed by, Jeet Heer, a reporter for the Toronto National Post , about Shakespeare and popular culture, August 14, 2001. The story ran on August 28, 2001.
    • June 14, 2000. Interviewed by a Brazilian newspaper journalist about Unspeakable ShaXXXspeares.
    • February 2000. Interviewed about Unspeakable ShaXXXspeares on GayBC radio, Seattle, Washington.
    • Interviewed by Scott Heller of The Chronicle of Higher Education in October 1998 about Unspeakable ShaXXXspeares for a "Hot Type" essay he wrote about both it and Harold Bloom's Shakespeare and the Invention of the Human .
    • Reader for Routledge Press, Blackwell Press, Cornell University Press, Princeton University Press, St. Martin's Press, University of Illinois Press, University of Minnesota Press, Wayne State University Press, Ashgate Press, Adaptation, Borrowers and Lenders, PMLA, and Renaissance Quarterly.

     

     

 

index | richard burt | publications | syllabi | reviews | history & film | loser theory
academedia | censorship | aBURraTions of theory | shakespeare manifesto | psycho-cinem-analysis


_____________________________________

What's the Worst Thing

You Can Do to Shakespeare?

Co-authored with Julian Yates (2013)

“A spectacular traversal and updating of Shakespeare's legacy as media event and up-to-the-minute report on traumatic narratives, blatant or concealed, that continue to hound us. I have the chapter on Hamlet's telephone on speed dial. A genuine achievement of boundary-breaking proportions and strong achronicities.”
Avital Ronell, author of The Telephone Book: Technology, Schizophrenia, Electric Speech

"Shakespeare is in the right kind of danger when he is taken up by the authors of this bracing, shamelessly provocative, and at times even charming book. What's the Worst Thing You Can Do to Shakespeare? asks how different media forms have jostled or interrupted our relationship with Shakespeare. Informed by the materialist turn in recent criticism, this book calls attention to the ways in which a variety of media forms – film, audio recordings, digital media, manuscript and print sources – create gaps in the archive that is Shakespeare. Filling, or failing to fill in these gaps, is the subject of this engaging study, which is far from the worst thing you could do to Shakespeare."
Michael Witmore, author of Shakespearean Metaphysics, and, with Rosamond Purcell, Landscapes of the Passing Strange: Reflections from Shakespeare

"In What’s the Worse Thing You Can Do to Shakespeare?, seasoned icono-clashers Richard Burt and Julian Yates scan the Shakespearean mediascape for its intensities, lags, evasions, and misfires. In wryly techno-savvy readings that cross-cut between the First Folio, conceived as a canny media launch, and contemporary video and film refractions, Burt and Yates renew the enterprise of close reading without either fetishizing the Shakespearean original or exchanging the vertiginous risks of unreadability for quick laughs and easy access."
Julia Reinhard Lupton, author of Thinking with Shakespeare: Essays on Politics and Life

 

Medieval and Eary Modern Film and Media

(Palgrave Macmillan, 2008)

PAPERBACK (2010)

"Like much of Burt's work, this book displays a dizzying array of ideas and information and speaks intelligently on all of it. Burt's knowledge of his diverse texts and subjects in this book is minute and encyclopedic. Medieval and Early Modern Film and Media is extremely well researched, and its weighty theoretical underpinnings are everywhere evident...Burt is a creative scholar known for pushing the boundaries in his work, and this book accomplishes that with panache...Burt has done much fine work in this book: it is erudite, playful, and challenging." - Renaissance Quarterly

"An important and theoretically sophisticated exploration of the ways that the emergence of new media necessitates a reexamination of the status of medieval films as textual artifacts that are not entirely distinct from the premodern sources on which they are based."

- Sixteenth Century Journal

"Burt's book reflects on the contemporary fascination with 'all things medieval,' and offers a comprehensive and ambitious examination of a wide range of films ... It has much to offer scholars interested in the intersection of historical studes and literary and media theory." -

- Parergon

"A marvelously rich and surprising book. Combining formal attentiveness with the giddy pleasures of the improbable detour, Burt's analysis of what he terms the 'philological uncanny' takes us from medieval illuminated manuscripts to digital media, from Shakespeare to spell-check, from the copyright page to the interpretive industry itself. By looking to the margins--the supplementary note, the anecdotal residue, the excrescent detail--Burt opens central, expansive questions about the logic of texts, about the character of historical time, even about the ongoing vexations of the academic unconscious."

-Christopher Pye, Professor of English, Williams College and author of The Regal Phantasm: Shakespeare and the Politics of Spectacle and The Vanishing: Shakespeare, the Subject, and Early Modern Culture

What if it were now possible to psychoanalyze our compulsive desire for historicism (old and new)? What if the arrival of the new media (computer screens, pdf, film, DVD, etc) with its complex paratextual apparatus made legible the unconscious filmic techniques of contemporary literary critics? Richard Burt's astonishingly ambitious Medieval and Early Modern Film and Media makes just this argument, moving effortlessly between seemingly disparate fields (historicism, film studies, and digital technologies) to offer a symptomatic reading of the "historicist uncanny." The book proceeds as a mesmerizing talking cure / trip to the movies that makes it possible to imagine all sorts of productively neurotic critical futures.

--Julian Yates, Associate Professor, Univ. of Delaware and author of Error, Misuse, Failure: Object Lessons from the English Renaissance

Hardcover 2008

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Unspeakable Shaxxxspeares: Queer Theory and American Kiddie Culture

Unspeakable ShaxxxspearesUnspeakable Shaxxxspeares

Hardcover 1998 / Paperback 1999

_____________________________________

Licensed By Authority: Ben Jonson and the Discourses of Censorship

Licensed By Authority

1993

_____________________________________

Edited Books:

Shakespeares After Shakespeare: An Encyclopedia of the Bard in Mass Media and Popular Culture

2006

_____________________________________


Shakespeare After Mass Media

Shakespeare After Mass Media

2001

_____________________________________

The Administration of Aesthetics: Censorship, Political Criticism, and the Public Sphere

The Administration of Aesthetics

1994

_____________________________________

Co-edited Books:

Shakespeare, the Movie II: Popularizing the Plays on Film, TV, Video, and DVD

Shakespeare, the Movie 2

2003

_____________________________________

Shakespeare, the Movie: Popularizing the Plays on Film, TV, and Video

Shakespeare, the Movie

1996

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Enclosure Acts: Sexuality, Property, and Culture in Early Modern England

1994

_____________________________________

Guest Editor of "Movie Medievalism" issue of Exemplaria

9.2. (Summer 2007)

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