Calendar of Events

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April

UF Genetics Institute Seminar Series – April
April Cellomics Seminars Series
THATCamp Gainesville: The Humanities and Technology Camp
April 24th, 8:30am-4:30pm
April 25th, 8:30am-12:30pm
Library West and Smathers Library East 1A

THATCamp stands for "The Humanities and Technology Camp." It is an unconference: an open, inexpensive meeting where humanities scholars and technologists of all skill levels learn and build together in sessions proposed on the spot. An unconference is to a conference what a seminar is to a lecture, what a pick-up game of Ultimate Frisbee is to an NBA game, or what a jam band is to a symphony orchestra: it's more informal and more participatory. Put simply, THATCamp is a place for you to indicate what you would like to learn in this area, and work with others to do so.

More information

Sponsored by UF CHPS and UF Libraries

Authors@UF: Readings and Conversation with Judith W. Page
Wednesday, April 23rd
Smathers Library (East), Rm 100, 3:00–5:00pm

Judith W. Page, director of the Center for Women's Studies and Gender Research, is a professor of English and Distinguished Teaching Scholar at the University of Florida, where she is also an affiliate of the Center for Jewish Studies. In the fall of 2012, she received the UF Outstanding Faculty Award from the Florida Blue Key. A PhD from the University of Chicago, she has been the recipient of several awards and fellowships from the NEH as well as a Skirball Fellowship at the Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, and, most recently, a Visiting Fellowship at the Chawton House Library in the UK, a repository of texts and manuscripts pertaining to early British women writers.

Sponsors: George A. Smathers Libraries
Free and open to the public

January

Trouble the Water
Wednesday, January 15th
Ustler Hall 2:30 pm

Panel on Trouble the Water with UF Professors Sharon Austin, Barbara Mennel, and Churchill Roberts, moderated by Professor Judith Page

On January 15, 2014, The Samuel Proctor Oral History Program will welcome Academy Award-nominated documentary filmmaker Tia Lessin , director and producer, along with Carl Deal of Citizen Koch and Trouble the Water, and co-producer of Capitalism: A Love Story, Fahrenheit 9/11, and Bowling for Columbine.

Wednesday, January 15th
Pugh Hall, 6:00 p.m.

Tia Lessin will host a public screening of Trouble the Water, a redemptive tale of a couple in Louisiana and a community abandoned long before Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf.
For more information: http://oral.history.ufl.edu/event/tia-lessin/

Sponsored by Center for Women's Studies and Gender Research

The Third Gierach Symposium on the Psychology of Politics
Health Disparities and Gender: Sex Differences in Drug Abuse Vulnerability and Treatment
January 16, 5:30 pm, Psychology Building, Room 130

"An Equal Right to Addiction: Unintended Consequences of Feminism in America"
Professor Laura Schmidt, UC, San Francisco

January 17, 9 am, Ustler Hall Atrium

"Sex Differences and Drug Abuse: Animal Models"
Professor Jill Becker, University of Michigan

"Gender, Sex Differences, and Addiction Research"
A Panel Discussion featuring UF faculty members Lisa Merlo Greene, Department of Psychiatry; Sara Jo Nixon, Department of Psychiatry; Stephanie Staras, Department of Health Outcomes & Policy; and Trysh Travis, Center for Women's Studies & Gender Research.

For more information: http://www.wst.ufl.edu/wst/Gierach%20eProgram.pdf

Sponsored by the Gierach Memorial Fund, the Department of Psychology, the Department of Political Science, and the Center for Women's Studies and Gender Research. Free and open to the public

In the Name of Love: Modern Mail Order Brides
A Film by Shannon O'Rourke. Introduction by Professor Laura Sjoberg
Wednesday, January 22nd
7:30 pm, The Wooly, 20 North Main Street, Gainesville

Sponsored by the Center for European Studies and the Center for Women's Studies and Gender Research. Thousands of Russian women sign up with agencies to meet and marry American men. From the gray skies of St. Petersburg to sunny California ranches, we see the financial and emotional pros and cons of exporting one's heart. Five Russian women, four of them single mothers, struggle for dignity as they endure male chauvinism, poverty, and culture shock all while searching for love. The film grapples with the tremendous challenges and difficult decisions facing Russian women today. Free and open to the public

Looking for Laura: Place, Memory, and the Authentic "Little House"
Thursday, January 23rd, 4:30-6:00 pm
Ruth McQuown Room, 219 Dauer Hall

Michelle McClellan, University of Michigan
For generations of readers in the US and around the world, Laura Ingalls Wilder's "Little House" books have epitomized the American pioneer experience. Over time, dedicated readers have sought out the places where Wilder and her family actually lived; today, these locations feature restored buildings, replica structures, and outdoor pageants enacting scenes from the book. Thousands of fans-affectionately known as "bonnetheads" visit them annually. What complex connections among fiction, history, and landscape do fans encounter when they go "looking for Laura"? Sponsored by The Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature, The Center for Women's Studies and Gender Research, CLAS Dean's Office, the Department Of English, and the Department of History
For more information: summary
Free and open to the public

UF Senate-sponsored Distinguished Professor Lecture by Les Thiele, Department of Political Science
Distinguished Professor of Political Science, Innovation and Ethics
"Fostering a Culture of Responsible Creativity"
Monday, January 27, 2014, 4:00 PM
Emerson Alumni Hall

Refreshments will be served
More information

Sustainable Citizenship
Monday, January 27
5:30-7:30 pm, Grand Ballroom, Reitz Union

Melissa Lane, Professor of Politics, Princeton University

Drawing on Plato and ancient Greek philosophy offers a vision of citizenship that does not divide 'man' from 'citizen'. Instead, the very idea of a politeia or constitution worthy of the name requires that in all their social roles, individuals evince a concern for the health of the whole. Citizenship for a sustainable society has to be psychologically and socially stable in ways that Plato and Greek thinkers can help us to understand.

Full summary here
Free and open to the public

"Civil" Society?
Bridging Indigenous and Scientific Knowledges: Multicultural Solutions for Climate Change Research
Kyle Whyte (Michigan State University)
Wednesday, January 29th, 5:30 pm
Smathers Library (East), 1A

Indigenous peoples living in North America have been affected by climate change in many ways, ranging from the losses of "first foods" to the permanent relocation of entire communities. As they develop ways to respond to the effects of climate change, however, Indigenous communities often face obstacles in creating dialogues with scientists, who do not necessarily understand their immediate and long term needs. Some of the key challenges concern bridging gaps in trust, power and expectations as to how to share and integrate empirical knowledge and information about climate change arising from sources as diverse as elders of Indigenous communities and senior climate scientists. This presentation outlines the recent history of dialogues and policies that attempt to foster collaboration across different cultural traditions of knowledge production, from "traditional ecological knowledge" to "climate science." The presentation then discusses some of the ethical solutions being developed for interdisciplinary and multicultural approaches to climate change that can be used by Indigenous communities for adaptation and mitigation. These solutions represent substantial steps forward toward finding common ground among diverse parties in the U.S. like federally-recognized Indigenous nations, state and federal agencies, universities and research centers, and Indigenous and non-Indigenous organizations.
For more information
Free and open to the public

February

Your Research on the International Space Station
Cancer & Genetics Research Complex Auditorium 101
2033 Mowry Road
11:00 AM - 3:00 PM

Please join the University of Florida and the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Feb. 6 for a conversation on how UF researchers can utilize the nation's most unique national laboratory: the International Space Station.

As the manager of the ISS National Laboratory, CASIS will present and answer questions on the types of research that can be sent into orbit, project funding and how to apply for these opportunities. Hosted by the UF Interdisciplinary Center for Biotechnology Research, the event also includes a question-and-answer panel and two interactive sessions for investigators interested in either Life and Biomedical Sciences, or Engineering, Materials Science, Chemistry, and Physical Sciences.

The university community is encouraged to attend this interdisciplinary and collaborative event, and to bring all ideas for space-based exploration.

All faculty, staff and students are welcome.

Registration is required – More detailed information

Using the PacBio: Importance of Long Sequencing Reads in Research
Monday, February 17, 9:45 am-12:30 pm
Cancer & Genetics Research Complex 451 A/B

Jonas Korlach, chief scientific officer of Pacific Biosciences, and UF's Eric Triplett, professor and chair of the Microbiology and Cell Science department, will present current applications of the PacBio platform and the benefits of long sequencing reads, including accuracy, improved quality, and data analysis.

RSVP
More detailed information

Authors@UF
Monday, February 17, 7:00 pm
Smathers Library, Room 1A

Presenter: Steven Noll, Dept History and David Tegeder, Dept Social & Behavioral Sciences, Santa Fe College & History, UF

Sponsors: George A. Smathers Libraries
More information

"Civil" Society?
The Slow Murmur of Learning: Honoring Substance and Solitude in Education
Diana Senechal (Columbia Secondary School, NYC)
Wednesday, February 19th, 5:30 pm
Hippodrome Theatre (cinema)

Over the past few decades, our schools' emphasis on quick results and feedback has left students with little room for absorbing complex material or taking risks with their own work. Several trends, not confined to education, have contributed to the problem: an insistence on concrete, measurable goals; a narrow view of student "engagement"; an emphasis on talk over quiet thought; and a push for teacher evaluation systems that focus on test score results and quick classroom observations. These tendencies, although based on good intentions, have contributed to an environment that discourages (and sometimes even penalizes) challenging study and independent thought. To address this problem, schools should honor those aspects of education that require solitude (as well as community) and grow in meaning over time.
For more information
Free and open to the public
Sponsors: Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere

Spring 2014 Conference, Feminist Publics, Current Engagements: Gender/Culture/Society 40 Years Later
A FEMINIST ANTHROPOLOGY SYMPOSIUM

This year's conference honors the fortieth anniversary of the publication of the landmark anthology in feminist anthropology, Woman, Culture, and Society, co-edited by Michelle Rosaldo and Louise Lamphere.

This conference will offer not only a retrospective consideration of the early days of feminist anthropology but a forward-looking assessment of new directions taken in the field. We invite you to join us for what will surely be of interest to a broad interdisciplinary audience.

February 20-21
Thursday, February 20
Ustler Hall, 3:30-5:30 PM

Conference Opening
Keynote Speaker Louise Lamphere (U of New Mexico)
Professor Lamphere will be our keynote speaker as the conference opens with her lecture and a reception. The following morning will feature a forum with our four invited speakers. More sessions will follow in the afternoon with speakers Fran Mascia-Lees, Carolyn Martin Shaw, and Martin Manalansan. Discussants from various departments at UF will follow the lectures.

Friday, February 21
Ustler Hall, 10 am-6:30 pm

Panels discussing contemporary issues within anthropology and related disciplines

Talks by: Carolyn Martin Shaw (UC Santa Cruz), Martin Manalansan (U of Illinois), Frances Mascia-Lees (Rutgers U)

For those planning to attend the Forum, the CWSGR website now has recommended background readings by the four invited speakers. Visit http://www.wst.ufl.edu/wst/Feminist%20Publics%202014.php

For more information: http://www.wst.ufl.edu/wst/FP%20Program%20e.pdf

Sponsored by the Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere and the Center for Women's Studies and Gender Research
All events are free and open to the public

Round Table discussion addressing: "What is scholarship?"
Monday, Feb 24, 4:00 PM
Emerson Alumni Hall

Panelists: Joe Glover, Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs
David Guzick, Senior Vice President for Health Affairs
Jack Payne, IFAS Senior Vice President for Agriculture and Natural Resources

Facilitator: Mike Foley, College of Journal and Communications

The session will expose members of the UF community to how different disciplines and colleges contribute to excellence is support of our mission. The panel of the administrative leaders of the three UF academic units will engage in a facilitated discussion on "disciplinary scholarship," and then the discussion will broaden with questions and comments from the audience. Each of those three units of academically-diverse faculty are supporting the tripartite mission of teaching, scholarship and service; however, the nature of those activities reflect the differences in disciplines.

March

Book Release: from the WARPAINT trilogy – Content Burns
Saturday, March 1

Stephanie A. Smith, Waldo W. Neikirk Term Professor, 2012-2013 and Associate Chair/Undergraduate Coordinator, Department of English is the author of the WARPAINT trilogy: Warpaint, Baby Rocket and Content Burns. The three novels are intertwined by love and friendship, and deal with contemporary women who are struggling to balance art, love, illness and trauma. Her other published novels include Snow-Eyes, The Boy Who Was Thrown Away, Other Nature, and two works of criticism, Conceived By Liberty and Household Words.

BABY ROCKET is in the #1 place for the People's Book Award in the UK www.peoplesbookprize.com/section.php?id=6

Content Burns chronicles the parallel stories of two women from the same family who bear the same Puritan name, Content Burns, and who are separated by three centuries: One born a Pequot Indian, originally named Ásawanuw (Corn-silk), who converts and marries into the English Burns family in 1637, and one, nicknamed Cabbi, in modern-day New York. They are unknown to each other yet both women must learn how to survive an historical trauma that changed the course of American history, and their lives: the massacre of the Pequot tribe in 1637 and the loss of the Twin Towers on 9/11.

Illumina Road Show: Next is Now
Tuesday, March 4, 9 am-12:30 pm
Cancer & Genetics Research Complex Auditorium 101

Featuring the NextSeq 500, Illumina will showcase the latest technology in next generation DNA sequencing through research talks and instrument demonstrations.

RSVP
More detailed information

International Symposium: French Music and Literature and Concert
March 11
Music Building, room 101, 7:30 pm concert

18th International Festival of Women Composers — focus on French music & literature

March 12
Music Building, room 101, 10:40 am

Introductory remarks by conference organizers: Dr. Sylvie Blum-Reid and Dr. Miriam Zach
Dr. Miriam Zach, University of Florida, "Elizabeth Claude Jacquet de la Guerre (1665-1729) Cantatas in La Grande Epoque: Musical performance practice in 18th century France."

Friends of Music Room, 11:45 am

Dr. Carol J. Murphy, University of Florida, "Julien Gracq's nocturnal musings in Le Roi Cophétua."

LUNCH BREAK, 12:35- 1:35 pm
Friends of Music Room, 1:35 pm

Dr. Sylvie Blum-Reid, University of Florida, "Music and Memory in Marguerite Duras's Indian Cycle."

Friends of Music Room, 2:45 pm, Introduction by Dr. Rori Bloom, University of Florida

Keynote speaker: Dr. Cormac Newark, University of Ulster, Londonderry, Ireland. "Opera in Proust."

3:30-4:30 Reception

This event is sponsored by the France-Florida Research Institute and International Studies Center, and the department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures.
It is free and open to all.

The Florida Civil Rights Struggle: Past & Present
Panel and Multimedia Presentation
Wednesday, March 12
6:00 to 8:00 p.m., Pugh Hall

For more information
Free and open to the public

"Civil" Society?
Studying Racist Activists: What Can Be Learned and What Cannot
Kathleen Blee (University of Pittsburgh)
Thursday, March 27th, 5:30 pm
Ustler Hall Atrium (2nd floor)

Is there anything to be gained by talking to people in racist groups? This talk wrestles with the dilemma of how we can find accurate information about the racist movements in our midst. From the massive Ku Klux Klan of the 1920s to today's small neo-Nazi groups, racist groups have fomented hatred and often violence against racial, ethnic, and religious minorities. Despite the danger that these movements pose to civil society, we know surprisingly little about how they work and how they recruit members. Based on decades of direct observation and interviews with those who populate America's racist underground, this talk explores what we know, what we don't know, and what we may never know about organized racism. It wrestles with moral and political dilemmas that occur when scholars work directly with violent political actors and raises questions about the advantages and perils of scholarship and dialogue with racist extremists.
For more information
Free and open to the public

"Civil" Society? On the Future Prospects of Meaningful Dialogue
Speaker Series 2013-2014

This series is made possible by the Rothman Endowment at the Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences with co-sponsorship from the UF Libraries, Honors Program, Department of History, Department of English, Samuel Proctor Oral History Program, and the Office of Sustainability.

General Objectives of the Series

Dialogues occur when conversations between two or more people clarify their positions on an issue. The sharing of opinions and ideas is the first step in solving significant problems. Why, then, do individuals, groups, and nations have such difficulty engaging in productive dialogue about life-and-death issues like climate change, racial prejudice, and the politics of wealth and health disparities? Since when has the polarization of opinions become so pronounced, and what is the impact of this state of affairs on civil discourse? And, why, in the digital age, do we rely upon the thirty-second sound bite instead of taking the time to reflect on the universal issues and interests that could unite us across our ideological differences? Moreover, if we want to change this status quo, what will it take to create safe spaces where we can exchange opinions with strangers and engage in genuine deliberation that emerges from individual experiences and not mere talking points?

In 2013-2014, the Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere at the University of Florida has organized a nine-month speaker series that seeks to understand the dialogues (or lack thereof) about major issues that have gained political traction in the United States. These issues are as basic as the future of our planet, the price of minority discrimination, and how we construct and remember our collective history. This speaker series has two parts. The first semester will examine the fault lines that divide us, and the conditions that prevent reasoned dialogue. The second semester will generate discussions of how we might foster conditions that will bring us closer together, or at least help us to enter into broader dialogue about the human condition. This semester on “healing” these fractures will explore the future impact of digitization on the written word, the importance of solitude to personal transformation, and how academic scholars can productively frame controversial research topics.

"Civil" Society?
Bridging Indigenous and Scientific Knowledges: Multicultural Solutions for Climate Change Research
Monday, April 14th
Weil Hall 0270 5:30 pm

Presenter: Kyle Powys Whyte (Michigan State University)

Indigenous peoples living in North America have been affected by climate change in many ways, ranging from the losses of "first foods" to the permanent relocation of entire communities. As they develop ways to respond to the effects of climate change, however, Indigenous communities often face obstacles in creating dialogues with scientists, who do not necessarily understand their immediate and long term needs. Some of the key challenges concern bridging gaps in trust, power and expectations as to how to share and integrate empirical knowledge and information about climate change arising from sources as diverse as elders of Indigenous communities and senior climate scientists. This presentation outlines the recent history of dialogues and policies that attempt to foster collaboration across different cultural traditions of knowledge production, from "traditional ecological knowledge" to "climate science." The presentation then discusses some of the ethical solutions being developed for interdisciplinary and multicultural approaches to climate change that can be used by Indigenous communities for adaptation and mitigation. These solutions represent substantial steps forward toward finding common ground among diverse parties in the U.S. like federally-recognized Indigenous nations, state and federal agencies, universities and research centers, and Indigenous and non-Indigenous organizations.
For more information

Sponsors: Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere
Free and open to the public

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