ALUMNI CLASnotes Semester, Year

 

Bookbeat


New books from CLAS alumni and faculty

Florida's IndiansFlorida's Indians: from Ancient Times to the Present
Jerald T. Milanich
(Anthropology, BA '67, MA '68, PhD '71)
University Press of Florida

(from book jacket)
Written for a general audience, this book is lavishly illustrated with full-color drawings and photographs. It skillfully integrates the latest archaeological and historical information about the Sunshine State's Native Americans, connecting the past and present with modern place-names, and it gives a proud voice to Florida's rich Indian heritage.

(excerpt)
That the lives of the Florida Indians changed dramatically during the colonial period is abundantly clear. In 1513 they had never seen a horse or a cow. A century and a half later they were raising these animals. It is no exaggeration to say that La Florida rested on the shoulders and backs of Florida Indians.


Haunted BodiesHaunted Bodies: Gender and Southern Texts
Edited by Anne Goodwyn Jones (English) and Susan V. Donaldson
University Press of Virginia

(from book jacket)
In Haunted Bodies, Anne Goodwyn Jones and Susan V. Donaldson have brought together some of our most highly regarded southern historians and literary critics to consider race, gender, and texts through three centuries and from a wealth of vantage points.

(excerpt)
Analyses of gender in American studies have tended to assume that the contours of gender that developed in the first half of the nineteenth century in the American North can be successfully generalized elsewhere.... Yet a moment's thought will make it clear that such gender assumptions could not work so smoothly for people in the American South, white or black, rich or poor, slave or free. For manhood, the notion of "the free play of individual interests" in a rigidly hierarchical and paternalistic society or of gaining social status through achievement rather than birth in a culture based on family lineage had to remain only a gleam in the eye for the Southerner born with the wrong blood or condition of servitude and without a silver spoon in his mouth.


Alligator TalesAlligator Tales
Compiled by Kevin McCarthy (English)
Pineapple Press

(from book jacket)
Collected here are true (and tongue-in-cheek) accounts of alligators and the people who have hunted them, been attacked by them, and tried to save them from extinction. Journey through the Everglades with 1800s Seminoles. Go along with a "Northern girl" as she shoots "my first alligator in my gloves and veil." And learn how modern alligator hunters go about their business, which hasn't changed much in the last hundred years or so.

(excerpt)
The University of Florida began using a gator for its mascot back in 1907. At that time, Philip Miller, who owned a stationery store in Gainesville, Florida, was visiting his son at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville. When he tried to order some University of Florida pennants there to sell in Gainesville, Miller suggested the alligator.... When the pennant maker admitted that he had never seen an alligator and could therefore not design one for the pennants, Miller's son went to the local library, found a picture of a gator in a book, and presented a copy to the pennant maker. When the pennants arrived in Gainesville in time for the 1908 football season, the blue banners had on them a large orange alligator--and a mascot was born.


Florida's IndiansIn Place of Slavery: A Social History of British Indian and Javanese Laborers in Suriname
Rosemarijn Hoefte
(Latin American Studies, MA '82, PhD '87)
University Press of Florida

(from book jacket)
In this first study ever of bonded labor in Suriname, Rosemarijn Hoefte discusses and compares the social, cultural, and economic consequences of migration and plantation life and offers insights into the system of indentured immigration in general.

(excerpt)
The population in Suriname, as elsewhere in the Caribbean, mostly judged the immigrants according to racial stereotypes, which exaggerated, distorted, and overgeneralized and accordingly naturalized the oppression and discrimination of certain groups. In the nearly seventy years of immigration, these stereotypes underwent little change. It seems that the planters emphasized already existing racial differences and prejudices as a means of convincing the nonwhites of their natural inferiority.


Africa EntrepreneurshipAfrica Entrepreneurship: Theory and Reality
Edited by Anita Spring and Barbara McDade (Geography)
University Press of Florida

(from book jacket)
Practical and penetrating, this collection explores the varieties of entrepreneurship in Africa--rural and urban, legal and illegal, formal and informal--and considers the vital role of entrepreneurs in the economic development of the continent from Ghana, Nigeria, and Cameroon to Kenya, Zimbabwe, Zambia, and South Africa.

(excerpt)
These studies describe and analyze enterprises that vary in size from manufacturing firms with 100 or more employees to handicraft enterprises with one employee. In addition to enterprise or firm size, the continuum of formal and informal sectors and private and public (to a lesser extent) enterprises is considered. In all, these studies show that entrepreneurship is not a missing commodity in Africa.


Enchanted Paths and Magic WordsEnchanted Paths and Magic Words: The Quantum Mind and Time Travel in Science and in Literary Myth
E.C. Barksdale
(Germanic and Slavic Studies)
Peter Lang

(from book jacket)
Dreams of time travel have long haunted the human imagination. Part One of this book offers a nontechnical account of some of the major current theories concerned with time travel and with the quantum mind. In Part Two, the reader goes on several trial-run trips in time with great writers and filmmakers as guides.

(excerpt)
We cannot really see time as a fourth dimension. Instead we perceive it as a one-directional dimension separate from the three dimensions of space; and we "crawl" along that dimension in one direction going from the past to the present and on to the future. We shall see later in this book that certain famous physicists, including Sir Isaac Newton, have proposed that there is no reason why we cannot in theory" crawl" back in the other direction; from future to the present and on into the past.

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