Around the College 

  
Rolfs Hall Rededicated 

When Rolfs Hall was built in 1927, it was only half finished.  In addition to more space, the initial design gave the building a tower and main entrance on its west side.  Although no new classroom space could be added (Turlington Hall, also known as "GPA," now surrounds Rolfs), recent renovations to the historic CLAS building included new wiring and an official entrance and tower (elevator shaft) mimicking Rolfs original design.  At a rededication ceremony in August, President Lombardi cut the ribbon (below), making official the new and improved Rolfs Hall.  

Lombardi cuts ribbon.
  


'Moses' Leads Pedestrians 
to Physics Building  
 
     As part of the state's One Percent for the Arts Program, construction funds for the new Physics Building included money to commission public artwork.  After conducting a national search, the art selection committee chose a design submitted by Seattle-based artist John Young.  A professor of sculpture and public art, Young (center), who is also the associate chair or the visual arts division of the School of Art at the University of Washington, has created twenty-five other large-scale public art commissions across the nation.  While in Gainesville last March to install his winning creation, entitled "Moses," Young explained that the piece merges art with science.  "I designed the piece to capture the nature of physics," he said, "so it deals with vectors, forces, gravity, tension and tension structures."  

  
  

Moses

 

African Artist-in-Residence
Abou Sylla and Moustapha Bangoura 
The 1998 African Artist-in-Residence Program at the University of Florida was delighted to host two artists this fall:  Moustapha Bangoura, a veteran performer of Africa's greatest dance company "Les Ballets Africains," and Abou Sylla, who is considered to be one of the five best balafon players in the world.  Both hail from Guinea.  On September 11, Bangoura (right) and Sylla (left) performed in the Friends of Music Room inside University Auditorium as part of the CLAS Center for African Studies Fall Reception.
 
CLAS Ceremonies Honor Students 
  
  
Baccalaureate 1998
Convocation 1998
  

(Left) Over 300 CLAS graduates, and hundreds of their families, friends and professors enjoyed the outdoor reception held after the 16th Annual Baccalaureate Ceremony last May.  (Right) Anderson Scholars Tuan Tran, Tatiana Dominguez and Daniel Almirall were three of the over 600 scholars honored at the 8th Annual CLAS Fall Convocation Ceremony in September.  

 
 
 
 
GuilletteNamed UF 
Teacher/Scholar of the Year 

 Lou Guillette  
  

     Lou Guillette (zoology) was named the 1997-98 Teacher/Scholar of the Year, an award President Lombardi describes as "our highest faculty honor...[it is] recognition of the qualities most valued by the University of Florida."  
     The award, created to reward excellence in teaching and distinction in scholarship, is made upon recommendations from faculty members and academic deans, with the approval of the Faculty Academic Advisory Group, the provost and the president.  Guillette who was formally recognized at the August Commencement Ceremony, also received a $2000 cash award.  

 

  
  

 

Lada Wins CAREER Grant  

Elizabeth Lada  

     In May, Elizabeth Lada (Astronomy) was awarded a five-year, $390,000 Faculty Early Career Development Program (CAREER) grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) for her work in studying young star clusters.  As part of her CAREER-funded work, Lada will carry out an educational plan that encourages, teaches and mentors high school, college undergraduates and graduate students toward careers in the physical sciences.  She joins five other young CLAS professors currently on CAREER grants.  
  
  
 

 CLAS Chemist Named Cottrell Scholar
 
Chemistry professor Jeffrey Krause has just been named a 1998 Cottrell Scholar.  The award, given annually by the Research Corporation to only 13 academics nationwide, seeks to recognize faculty who excel in both teaching and research.  The award comes with a $50,000 stipend to further recipients' work. 
 
 
 
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